Our Faculty Researchers

University of Chicago

Elisabeth Moyer (Principal Investigator)

Liz's research interests fall in two main threads. The first includes the use of the isotopic composition of atmospheric water vapor as a tracer of convective processes, cirrus formation, and stratosphere-troposphere exchange; and the design of spectroscopic techniques for in-situ trace gas measurements. The second includes climate (and human) response to greenhouse-gas forcing; development of tools for impacts assessment; statistical emulation of climate model output; and climate and energy policy evaluation.

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University of Washington

Peter Blossey

Peter's research focuses on how clouds impact on the energy and water cycles of the earth: by redistributing water vapor, producing precipitation and changing the earth's radiative balance. Clouds over the tropical and subtropical oceans have been a topic of recurrent interest, including studies on the aggregation of both deep and shallow convective clouds into clusters, the feedbacks of boundary layer clouds on climate, and the information that water isotopic tracers can provide about deep convection and the tropical tropopause layer. Idealized simulations that resolve some or most of the turbulent motions are the tool most often used in his research. He has also worked to develop numerical methods for atmospheric applications and contributed to studies of trapped mountain waves and orographic precipitation, among other projects. More information can be found on his website.

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University of Washington

Thomas Ackerman

Tom's current research focuses on:
- Climate Engineering - Science and Ethics
- Marine Cloud Brightening as a means of climate engineering
- Ocean-atmosphere coupling and the effects of cloud feedbacks
- Use of satellite and ground-based data to evaluate climate model cloud properties
- Understanding the maintenance and formation of thin tropical tropopause cirrus


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University of Washington

Christopher Bretherton

Chris is an atmospheric scientist who studies cloud formation and turbulence and improves how they are simulated in global climate and weather forecast models. His group at UW has pioneered machine learning strategies for parameterization of cloud processes in climate models and the application of global cloud-resolving modeling to improve the representation of clouds, aerosol and precipitation processes. He co-leads a new climate modeling initiative at Vulcan Inc. in Seattle that is continuing this work in collaboration with GFDL to improve prediction of precipitation on all time scales from days to decades in their suite of weather and climate models. His research also includes participating in field experiments and observational analyses, three-dimensional modeling of fluid flow in and around fields of clouds, and understanding how clouds will respond to and feed back on climate change. Computer code developed by his research group for simulating cloud formation by atmospheric turbulence is used in the two leading US climate models.

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Harvard University

Zhiming Kuang

The main goal of Zhiming's current research is to better understand and simulate how tropical convection interacts with the large-scale flow. This interaction is key to the tropical circulation, particularly the rainfall distribution and its variability. These issues are important to society. Variations in the Asian monsoon rain, for example, can bring droughts or floods and affect the lives of billions of people. Despite its well appreciated importance, our understanding of how tropical convection interacts with the large-scale flow remains poor, so does our ability to simulate this interaction. In our research, we use novel high resolution numerical model experiments, together with observational data analysis, to guide development of theoretical models. Besides the meteorological implications of tropical convection, we are also interested in its role in global chemistry.

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Princeton University

Stephan Fueglistaler

The main goal of my current research is to better understand and simulate how tropical convection interacts with the large-scale flow. This interaction is key to the tropical circulation, particularly the rainfall distribution and its variability. These issues are important to society. Variations in the Asian monsoon rain, for example, can bring droughts or floods and affect the lives of billions of people. Despite its well appreciated importance, our understanding of how tropical convection interacts with the large-scale flow remains poor, so does our ability to simulate this interaction. In our research, we use novel high resolution numerical model experiments, together with observational data analysis, to guide development of theoretical models. Besides the meteorological implications of tropical convection, we are also interested in its role in global chemistry.

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University of Chicago

Tiffany Shaw

The goal of my research program is to advance the understanding of atmospheric and climate dynamics and improve state-of-the-art numerical models that inform society of the future impacts of climate change. To that end I combine theoretical principles of classical mechanics and modern tools from applied mathematics with observational analysis and numerical modeling. I am particularly interested in the role of waves and turbulence in the atmosphere and how they shape the Earth's climate. More specifically, I am interested in understanding how moisture is transported and how it interacts with large-scale flow patterns to shape regions of precipitation and evaporation and how the largest waves on the planet, which can propagate into the stratosphere, impact surface climate.

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Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique,France

Bernard Legras

Bernard Legras’ fields of interest are transport and mixing in the atmosphere, stratospheric dynamics, ice clouds dynamics and microphysics. He is a member of the Academia Europaea and the scientific chair of the ICARE data thematic center on aerosols and clouds. Bernard is a member of the science team for the StratoClim campaign.

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University of Auckland, New Zealand

Tra Dinh

I study atmospheric processes that span a multitude of spatial and temporal scales, from the microphysics of clouds, the dynamics of atmospheric gravity waves, to the global circulation, energy and moisture budgets. I use theory and numerical tools, in combination with observations, to study how the multi-scale interactions of atmospheric processes underline the basic structure of the atmosphere and how these interactions will contribute to future climate change. I have been involved extensively in the implementation and development of both Cloud-Resolving Models (CRMs) and General Circulation Models (GCMs).

 

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Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany

Martina Krämer

Martina Krämer is an internationally renowned expert in the field of cloud physics, especially with regard to the influence of ice clouds on the climate through radiation effects. She works both experimentally and with numerical models. In her research in the field of atmospheric physics, she performs in situ measurements of ice crystals and water vapor from high-altitude airplanes as well as computer-based modelling of ice clouds. Martina is interested in the formation and growth of ice clouds and their influence on the Earth's energy budget.

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Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany

Ottmar Möhler

Ottmar Moehler studies ice nucleation, cloud microphysics, and aerosol-cloud interactions in experiments using the Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) chamber at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in Karlsruhe, Germany. AIDA is the largest cloud chamber in the world and a unique experimental facility for investigating the impact of aerosols on climate, weather, and the environment, allowing cloud simulation experiments in conditions ranging to the low pressures and ultralow temperatures of the tropical tropopause layer.


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ETH Zürich, Switzerland

Heini Wernli

Heini Wernli investigates the dynamics and climatology of extratropical weather systems, and transport processes in the atmosphere of water, dust, and trace gases. His research group combines numerical modeling, field experiments, and diagnostic techniques, and includes studies of the isotopic composition of water vapor in cloud and climate models.


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Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany

Aiko Voigt

Aiko Voigt studies the interplay of the radiative effects of clouds and global dynamics and climate: how interactions with clouds shape the atmospheric circulation.

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Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique, France

Claudia Stubenrauch

Claudia Stubenrauch is an expert on satellite measurements of cloud properties, as well as their representation in global climate models.


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Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany

Rolf Müller

Rolf Muller studies stratospheric chemistry and dynamics, including the amount and distribution of stratospheric water vapor and controls on its potential changes.

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